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27 Synonyms for Experience with examples

Regardless of what you’re doing, there may be many times when you need to describe the experience that you have. Examples of such times include answering questions during job interviews, talking about the things you did on vacation with your friends, or speaking to your family about your future plans.

If you find yourself in one of these situations, you may need to describe your experiences several times. However, it is not necessary to use the word experience over and over. Instead, you can use one of the following synonyms, depending on what specific meaning you want to say.

Experience have several different meanings, and the list below is categorized according to part of speech (verb or noun) and definition.

Experience synonyms as a verb

Experience as a verb means to have practical contact with something.

To be involved in

This phrase means to take part in something, and to act in it. You can be involved in a play, an organization, an event, or something else that requires you to dedicate some time, energy, and possibly money into it.

Examples

  • Robert is involved in a dance group at his university, and they will perform at the talent show tomorrow night.
  • Amelia wanted her husband to be involved in their children’s school, but he was too busy with work to commit to it.
  • I don’t want my brother to be involved in that group of people.

To participate in

Similar to being involved with something, to participate in something means to take part in it and contribute time and energy. Often, you can participate in various events, but groups and organizations can be participated in as well.

Examples

  • Sophia participated in the tennis tournament and won first place, bringing the trophy home to her school.
  • Greg wanted to participate in Woman’s March downtown tonight, so he went home early to prepare to go.
  • Manuel founded a nonprofit organization that helps tutor low-income students after school, and he is asking everyone he knows to participate in teaching the students.

To be exposed to

Another way to experience something is to be exposed to it, or simply observe and have something made known to you. Sometimes, just being able to see something can bring it from a concept and theory to a real thing, and increase your sympathy to it.

Examples

  • Max’s parents wanted him to be exposed to different styles of living around the world so that he would be able to appreciate the things that he had.
  • In my line of work, I have been exposed to the way that the health care system really works; many people who come to the emergency room don’t actually need emergency care but come anyway because they cannot afford to go to the regular doctor.
  • Noah decided that being a lawyer was his career goal after he was exposed to the excitement and drama of a courtroom.

To observe

One way to gain exposure to something is to observe it, or see it with your own eyes but not participate in it. This type of experience can be useful for a high-risk job, such as a police officer or surgeon, who should not try to get hands-on experience without enough training.

Examples

  • Jenny sat outside the classroom observing the teaching talking to her students.
  • The zoology students went to the ornithology exhibit at the local zoo to observe birds in captivity to prepare for their field trip to see wild birds in the forest.
  • Thomas was nervous before performing his first surgery because he had only observed his mentor do surgeries before.

To be aware of

To be aware of something means to have an idea that it exists. It means that you move from not knowing what something is to having a basic understanding of it, which is an important first leap. However, simply knowing that something exists and being an advocate for it are two different things, so if you talk about awareness of something in a job interview, make sure you can elaborate as well.

Examples

  • I am aware of the problems with freedom of speech, but I still think freedom to say what you want is incredibly important.
  • Liam was vaguely aware of what his coworkers were saying about him, but all he cared about is what his boss thought about him.
  • Sarah is aware of the importance of time management, so she designed a calendar system that worked for her.

To be familiar with

Being familiar with something is a small step up from simply being aware of it. To be familiar with a problem or system means that you can probably describe it, provide solutions, and have your own insight to offer, even if you are not an expert yet.

Examples

  • Fred’s boss wanted him to become familiar with the inner workings of the conference before he started planning it.
  • Danielle is more familiar with biological psychology than social psychology, so she works in a research lab with human test subjects.
  • The political candidate thought that was familiar with the issue in the Middle East but it was clear from his interview that he was not.

To understand

Another step up from being familiar with something is to understand it – or to know the information you need and be able to explain it to someone else. You may be approaching being an expert on the issue.

Examples

  • I understand how book publishing works, so I can make sure to pitch your manuscript in a way that maximizes the possibility of publication.
  • If Theresa understood why the company morale was so low, she would be able to prevent it from getting any worse.
  • Beth was finally able to understand why her parents were always so worried about her when she had her first child.

To have insight into

When you understand something, you may take your understanding up a step and offer your own thoughts and new ideas. Your insights are new ideas what you can contribute.

Examples

  • The consultant has some useful insights into how we can increase our earnings this year.
  • It was a good thing that Joe had insight into the market research we did so that we could create a really successful product.
  • The mark of a good teacher is having insight into how students learn and how they can apply their knowledge.

To encounter

To encounter means to meet something or someone.

Examples

  • I have encountered this problem before, so I know how to solve it.
  • Ed encountered his dream girl on the subway but she walked away before he could say hi.
  • The company has never encountered much criticism because they have been very successful in the things that they tried.

To endure

If you endure something, you experience it but often with pain and suffering, whether physical or psychological.

Examples

  • Emma had to endure the grueling hours of her internship last summer, but it all paid off when the company she was interning for offered her a full-time job.
  • As you get older, you have to choose between living rent-free with your parents but enduring their concern and nagging or paying rent but having more freedom.
  • If you can endure the challenges at the beginning, you will be rewarded in the end.

To come into contact with

To come into contact with means to physically or metaphorically see, feel, or take part in something. This usually means that you had just a simple, non-serious interaction with something – not anything serious.

Examples

  • Zoe came into contact with the poisonous spider, but luckily the doctor at the emergency room had an antidote and prevented her from suffering any damage.
  • I came into contact with the World Health Organization for the first time when I was in high school, and have wanted to work for them ever since.
  • Tony came into contact with similar challenges at her previous job, so she is able to explain how we can best combat our current problem.

To come across

Coming across something means to stumble upon it, or see it when you are looking for something else or nothing in particular.

Examples

  • The rookie police officer came across a photo of the victim and his brother at a poker tournament, giving the precinct a new lead on the murder case.
  • I was reading the newspaper last night and came across the idea of the ten-thousand-hour rule – have you heard about it?
  • Brianna was browsing through Facebook, hoping to come across news of her ex-boyfriend but she could not find anything.

To face

To face something – usually a challenge or problem – means to deal with or work to solve something.

Examples

  • Harry Potter faced Lord Voldemort many times throughout his time at Hogwarts School of Wizardry.
  • Do not be afraid to face your fears, for having overcoming them will only make you stronger.
  • Olivia could not face her brother after she accidentally spilled her juice on his laptop.

To feel

Experiencing an emotion is to feel that emotion.

Examples

  • Ben did not know that he could feel as much fear as he did in that moment, standing on the edge of the cliff looking down.
  • Lily felt a surge of excitement when she woke up on Christmas Day, and then rushed downstairs to see all the presents she had been given.
  • Dylan made his mom feel pride, which gave him more motivation to work hard.

Experience synonyms as a noun, meaning skills and previous work in something

Skill

The skills that you have are the abilities you have to do something.

Examples

  • Your writing skills are incredible.
  • Emily’s teacher thought that her language skills were far better than everyone else in her class.
  • William has enough skill to win the tournament, but only if he keeps practicing.

Practical knowledge

Having practical knowledge in something means to have done it.

Examples

  • Your practical knowledge in getting others to cooperate will be far more useful than the things you have read in a book for this task.
  • Much of what a formal education is lacking is the practical knowledge you need to succeed in the world, especially concerning money and investing.
  • Noah decided to do the internship instead of volunteering at his church like he did every summer because he wanted to get some practical knowledge in his field now that he was in college.

Practice

Practice is the act of doing something over and over and slowly improving over time. For many skills, practice is required if you want to improve, such as for playing a sport, writing, designing, or public speaking.

Examples

  • It takes 10,000 hours of practice to become an expert at something, according to Malcolm Gladwell.
  • All the athletes that you look up to spend the majority of their lives practicing their sport.
  • Victoria had to practice her presentation ten times in front of the mirror before she felt ready to give it at school.

Training

Training a special kind of instruction or education that helps you improve a certain skill.

Examples

  • If your employer is not paying you to attend different trainings to improve your skills, you should ask them to fund something.
  • The training that Molly wants to attend will cost several thousand dollars, but she thinks it will be worth it.
  • Even animals have to receive training to be ready to perform at the circus or in a theme park show.

Learning

Learning is the process through which you gain knowledge or skills. It may be dependent on having a teacher to help you, but can also be done yourself.

Examples

  • Your learning is in your own hands; it doesn’t have to stop after you graduate from school.
  • If you cannot do something, you can try learning it before asking for help.
  • Jeremy’s teacher is not very clear, so he has to do a lot of learning by himself.

Education

Education is systematized learning and a transfer of skills from teacher to student. Most of the time, it refers to a formal school system, including university.

Examples

  • While having a basic education is important, many skills can be learned on your own through the internet now.
  • Xavier wanted to get an education but could not afford college tuition, so he turned to videos on YouTube and was able to use that to convince an employer to hire him.
  • Education often requires you to learn through books, but practical experience is just as, if not more, important.

Background

Having a background or experience in something means to have some context in it. This can often include educational or work experience.

Examples

  • My university background is in computer science, and I want to specialize in game design.
  • Even though Tyler has a background in psychology instead of marketing, he has shown that what he knows can bring a different perspective for our products.
  • What is your educational and professional background?

Knowledge

The things that you know are your knowledge, whether it is something you know how to do or facts that you can teach to someone else.

Examples

  • A thirst for knowledge is the mark of a good student.
  • Some knowledge you can only learn from a book, but other knowledge you can only learn from doing something.
  • Children often protest that they will not need the knowledge taught to them at school, but many of them grow up to find that they do.

Know-how

Another term for know-how is the French savoir faire, which is also used in English to mean the ability to know what to do and handle a situation.

Examples

  • Know-how often refers to skills like speaking a language instead of facts because it is a more abstract ability to do something well.
  • Barney has outstanding know-how when it comes to getting people to do what he wants.
  • Being a great translator takes a lot of know-how, which can only be gained over years of practice and experience, and possibly having a good mentor.

Experience synonyms as a noun, meaning something that happens

Incident

Anything that happens can be an incident, but the word sometimes refers to bad things that happen.

Examples

  • There was an incident of misbehavior at the school, so the children’s parents were called.
  • The company did not want another incident of mistreating customers, so they instituted a new policy calling for the firing of employees who did not handle conflicts with grace and patience.
  • The incident at the office served as a warning for the leadership.

Event

An event is anything that happens as well, but events are usually of some importance or interest.

Examples

  • Will you attend the events to raise money for the charity?
  • Nancy invited me to her barbeque event for the Fourth of July, and I already told her that we would go.
  • There are thousands of events at every Olympic Games, and I watch as many of them as I can on TV.

Happening

Another word for experience, a happening usually refers to something informal and quick, such as a get-together between a group of friends. In some contexts, a happening may refer to a play or act.

Examples

  • Did you see the news about the new happening at the theater?
  • Frank invited me to the happening at Tess and Jenna’s place tonight but I’m not sure I will go.
  • Blaine wanted to organize a happening for the group, but he got busy and ended up not having time to plan anything.

Affair

While an affair can be an instance of someone who is in a relationship cheating, in this context it means a type of event, usually something fancy and formal like a party or gala.

Examples

  • Will you attend the black-tie affair with your wife tomorrow evening?
  • The Winterbottoms are planning a Christmas affair to raise money for their charity foundation.
  • No one would take responsibility for the disastrous media affair, but the company recovered anyway.
english vocabulary, myenglishtecher.ue, myenglishtecher.ue/blog

112 Phrases for Saying Thank You in Any Situation

SAYING THANK YOU TO YOUR TEACHER

thank you teacher card

This can be done in many ways. As we know, teachers are generally helpful, considerate, encouraging, and forthcoming towards their students.

The way you say it would depend on what you are saying thank you for. Teachers are some of the most influential and inspiring people that we come across in our lives, yet they tend to be regrettably under-appreciated.

Just writing a simple ‘thank you’ note, or saying a few special words will go a long way, and be remembered for years to come. Even recommending your teacher to others is a great way to show that you really enjoyed studying with them!

Phrases with examples:

  • Thank you I really appreciate your help.
  • I am eternally grateful for everything you’ve taught me.
  • Thank you for sharing your wisdom with me.
  • I cannot thank you enough for helping me.
  • I am very thankful that you are my teacher.
  • How can I ever thank you enough.
  • Teachers like you are not easy to find.
  • I really appreciate all the hard work you’ve done to help me.
  • I am grateful for the positive learning environment you provided me with.
  • I have learnt so much, thanks to you.
  • Thank you for your guidance and support.
  • Thank you for helping me improve.
  • I want you to know how much I value your support.
  • Your lessons have been very insightful and fun!
  • I have had so much fun learning with you!
  • Your approach to teaching inspires me.
  • Thank you for being patient and helping me improve.
  • I wholeheartedly appreciate everything you’ve done for me.
  • You’re the best teacher ever!
  • “I just want to say how grateful I am that you were my teacher. Your guidance and support has been amazing! Thank you for helping me improve”
  • “I really appreciate all the hard work you’ve done to help me. I have learnt so much, and it’s all thanks to you!”
  • “You were there for me every step of the way, and I wholeheartedly appreciate everything you’ve done for me.”
  • “Thank you for being so patient, and helping me improve! Teachers like you are hard to find, and I’m eternally grateful for everything you’ve taught me.”
  • “I had so much fun learning with you. Your lessons were very insightful and interactive, so thank you. You’re the best teacher ever!

SAYING THANK YOU AT A WEDDING

wedding

There are various reasons why people would want to express thanks to wedding guests. Maybe they bought an extravagant wedding present, gave a generous monetary gift, helped with the preparations, or simply turned up to join in the special celebrations!

It could even be that you were the wedding guest, and would like to thank them for the invite! Pick the right words and remember to make everyone feel like you really appreciate what they’ve done for you.

Phrases with examples:

  • Thank you for coming.
  • Thank you for joining us today.
  • We appreciate you sharing our celebrations with us.
  • Thank you for sharing this special day with us.
  • We really appreciate your presence here.
  • Thank you for the gift, we’re very grateful.
  • I cannot thank you enough for the wonderful gift.
  • We will remember this day and your contribution forever.
  • You were invaluable today, thank you for all your help.
  • What would we have done without your help? Thank you so much. (Rhetorical question)
  • Thank you ever so much for your generous gift.
  • Words cannot describe how grateful we are.
  • It was a pleasure to be a part of your special day.
  • Thank you for inviting me to share your special day.
  • I’m very happy to be a part of your celebrations.
  • “Thank you for coming today. It’s been such a wonderful day, and we really appreciate you sharing it with us.”
  • “Thank you for the gift, and for joining us today. It’s been so special, and we’re really glad you were her.”
  • “Thank you so much for everything you did to help make this day perfect. What would we have done without you?” (Rhetorical question)
  • “Thank you for all the lovely gifts, and for being here with us. It means a lot.”
  • “Words cannot describe how grateful we are for your generous gift. Thank you ever so much.”
  • “It was a pleasure to be a part of your special day. Thank you for inviting me, and sharing your happiness.”

SAYING THANK YOU AT CHRISTMAS

Christmas is a very special time of the year for many families; it is a time when friends and families can get together and celebrate in good cheer. It is usually a time of union, togetherness, and goodwill.

If you don’t celebrate Christmas, you may have an alternative special celebration which brings you closer to your loved ones, such as Eid, Diwali, Thanksgiving Day, or Hanukkah.

These expressions can be used for any of these occasions! Just change the word ‘Christmas’ to your own special occasion.

Phrases with examples:

  • Thank you for the wonderful Christmas present.
  • Thank you for the Christmas wishes.
  • Sending special thanks to you this Christmas. (Written message)
  • I’d like to say a warm thank you to you this Christmas.
  • Thank you for making me feel special this Christmas.
  • Thank you so much for making my Christmas so special.
  • Thanks for the Christmas gifts; I love them!
  • It has been a very special Christmas thanks to you. Happy Holidays.
  • Thank you Santa! The children loved your gifts.
  • Thank you for inviting us to your beautiful home for Christmas.
  • Thank you for the wonderful Christmas feast!
  • Thank you for including us in your Christmas festivities.
  • Thank you for hosting Christmas dinner; it was divine.
  • Thank you for a memorable Christmas gathering.
  • You are a very gracious host. Thank you for the warm invite.
  • I really appreciate the gift card, thank you so much!
  • Thank you for such a practical gift.
  • Thank you for the beautiful Christmas card.
  • We all appreciate the lovingly wrapped gifts. Thank you so much!
  • Sending you wishes of joy and happiness in return.
  • Thank you for spreading the Christmas cheer.
  • What a magical Christmas experience! Thank you.
  • “I’d like to say a very warm thank you to you this Christmas. Thank you for making us feel so special. Merry Christmas”
  • “Thank you for inviting us to your beautiful home for Christmas! You are a very gracious host and we had a magical time. Warm Wishes.”
  • “What a wonderful Christmas feast, thank you ever so much! We had a lovely time.”
  • “Thank you for the beautiful Christmas presents. How thoughtful of you!”
  • “Thank you for the Christmas parcel. Sending you wishes of joy and happiness in return.”

 

SAYING THANK YOU TO YOUR BOSS

conversation

Managers, supervisors, and other people in superior positions to you at work can be quite hard to speak to on a regular day, let alone when having to say ‘thank you’ for something!

Especially if they have given you something you really needed, such as extended holiday time, professional support or even a promotion!

Using the right words is very important, if you want them to really understand how grateful you are, and that you’re not just saying thanks because they’re your boss and you have to…..!

Phrases with examples:

  • Thank you for extending compassion and flexibility when I needed it.
  • As a supervisor, you are truly inspirational to your staff.
  • Your strong leadership skills along with your support has earned you much deserved respect.
  • Your support and dedication to your team has earned you much deserved admiration.
  • I am thankful to be a part of your team.
  • The workers have seen your dedication, and we would like to express our appreciation.
  • We are grateful for your kindness, loyalty and commitment to all of us.
  • If there ever was a boss who deserves praise and adulation, that person is you!
  • Thank you for providing us with such a great working environment.
  • I want to thank you for the expression of faith in my abilities.
  • I would like to sincerely thank you for this gesture.
  • Allow me to express my sincerest gratitude for this opportunity you have given me.
  • I value the trust you have put into me and will work hard to maintain it.
  • Thank you very much for putting your trust in me and agreeing to my extended holiday request.
  • I am eternally grateful for your trust, and appreciate you allowing me to have this time off work.
  • Thank you for your support, guidance and encouragement.
  • Thank you for the opportunities you provided, and for having faith in me.
  • I would like to express my heartfelt thanks for giving me this opportunity.
  • “I would like to sincerely thank you for such a fantastic opportunity. I appreciate your faith in my abilities and will certainly do my very best to meet your expectations.”
  • “Allow me to express my sincerest gratitude for this opportunity you have given me. I am eternally grateful for the trust you have put in me and will work hard to maintain it.”
  • “Thank you for extending compassion and flexibility when I needed it. As a supervisor, you are truly inspirational to your staff.”

 

SAYING THANK YOU IN FORMAL BUSINESS

thank you boss

In the business world, sometimes it is important to express thanks to people other than your boss too, such as colleagues, other firms, or even clients!

Showing that you appreciate them placing their business with you, providing support, or even partnership, is important. Here is how you can say it well. Most of these can be used for direct contact or email communication.

Phrases with examples:

  • Thank you very much; your support is greatly appreciated.
  • We would like to express our gratitude.
  • I am most grateful for your support.
  • Thank you for providing the requested information.
  • Thank you for all your assistance.
  • Thank you for raising your concerns.
  • Thank you for your kind co-operation.
  • Thank you for your attention to this matter.
  • Thank you for your consideration.
  • Thank you once again for everything you’ve done.
  • How kind you are to help me. Thank you very much.
  • Thank you for spending time with me.
  • Thank you for taking the trouble to help me. I do appreciate it.
  • Many thanks for your assistance in our project.
  • Many thanks for your letter/email.
  • I was so pleased to hear from you.
  • I greatly appreciate your kind words.
  • I am very thankful that you are considering my problem.
  • Thank you for your kind consideration.
  • “I was so pleased to hear from you, and am very thankful that you’re considering my problem. Thank you for your attention to this matter.”
  • “I would like to express my gratitude for all that you have done. I am most grateful for your support. Thank you for taking the time to help me, I really do appreciate it.”
  • “I am very thankful that you are considering my application. I appreciate your response and look forward to hearing from you again soon.”
  • “Thank you for raising your concerns. I appreciate your co-operation and will respond to your query very soon.”

 

ACCEPTING THANKS

  • That’s all right.
  • You’re welcome.
  • You’re very welcome.
  • Don’t mention it.
  • Not at all.
  • It wasn’t a problem at all.
  • It’s nothing.
  • It’s my pleasure.
  • The pleasure is all mine.
  • My pleasure.
  • “Thanks a lot for your help, you’re very kind.” – “Don’t mention it.”
  • ‘Thanks a lot for looking after the children.” – “It’s my pleasure. I love children.”
  • “Thank you so much. I couldn’t have managed without your help.” – “No problem.”
  • “Thank you for such a wonderful gift.” – “You’re very welcome.”